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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dress and cultural identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire found in the catalog.

Dress and cultural identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire

Ursula Rothe

Dress and cultural identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire

by Ursula Rothe

  • 204 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Archaeopress, Available from Hadrian Books in Oxford .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Clothing and dress -- Social aspects -- Germany -- History,
  • Germany -- Antiquities

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-97) and index.

    StatementUrsula Rothe.
    SeriesBAR international series -- 2038, BAR international series -- 2038.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsGT555 .R68 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 179 p., 40 p. of plates :
    Number of Pages179
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24064942M
    ISBN 101407306154
    ISBN 109781407306155
    LC Control Number2009415989

    Religion in ancient Rome includes the ancestral ethnic religion of the city of Rome that the Romans used to define themselves as a people, as well as the religious practices of peoples brought under Roman rule, in so far as they became widely followed in Rome and Italy. The Romans thought of themselves as highly religious, and attributed their success as a world power to their collective piety. It has sometimes been part of a larger empire, as when it was the Roman province of Africa, sometimes an independent unit, as under the medieval Hafsid dynasty, but always distinct. Today Tunisia is part of the larger Arab world, with which it shares a language and many cultural elements, including a .

    the roman empire and judea The way the Roman Empire developed, was gradually to take over more and more territories in the eastern Mediterranean. Some of these were governed as provinces.   Blood of the Provinces is the first fully comprehensive study of the largest part of the Roman army, the auxilia. This non-citizen force constituted more than half of Rome's celebrated armies and was often the military presence in some of its territories. Diverse in origins, character, and culture, they played an essential role in building the empire, sustaining the unequal peace celebrated as.

    Equally, no systematic account is given here of Roman relations with the western Greeks, although in many respects they shared in the experiences and developments described here: Wilson, R. J. A., Sicily under the Roman Empire. The archaeology of a Roman province 36B.C.–A.D. () at 29 – 32 stresses the minimal impact of Roman culture. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes The Roman Empire (60 BCE CE) Study Guide has everything .


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Dress and cultural identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire by Ursula Rothe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Rothe, Ursula ().Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire. British Archaeological Reports, (S).

Oxford: Archaeopress. : Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire (BAR International Series) (): Rothe, Ursula: BooksCited by: 4.

Add tags for "Dress and cultural identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire". Be the first. This revised Phd thesis uses the large extant corpus of funerary art from the Rhine Moselle region, to examine and analyse the clothing depicted and to ask what they can tell us about cultural identity in this frontier region and how they can be used.

Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire. British Archaeological Reports, International Series by U. Rothe Article in Britannia Author: Mary Harlow.

Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire general and the possible significance of the various bonnets that appear to have played such a central role in native dress in the Rhine-Moselle region.

The final section looks at the phenomenon of mixing garments of different origin within the same outfit as a. Compte-rendu de ROTHE Ursula, Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire, Oxford, (BAR International Series, ).

Ursula ROTHE. Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire. BAR International Series,Archaeopress, Oxford. Mirila: kulturni fenomen.

Studia mythologica Slavica. Supplementa (Ljubljana), suppl. 3, Inštitut za arheologijo i Znanstvenoraziskovalni center SAZU. Andrej PLETERSKI -Goran Pavel. As part of the Gorgias Handbook Series, this book provides a political and military history of the Sasanian Empire in Late Antiquity (s to CE).

The book takes the form of a narrative, which situates Sasanian Iran as a continental power between Rome and the world of the steppe nomad. Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire, Article Feed @ Joined Janu ; Community standards; Republishing guidelines.

Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire () Rothe, Ursula British Archaeological Reports ISBN: | Publisher: Archaeopress | Published: Oxford. Book chapters. Veiling in Pannonia () Rothe, Ursula. with identity in the Roman world, we should be wary of the concept of a single “Roman identity,” and instead frame Roman social and cultural history in terms of multiple “Roman identities.”2 In chapters 2 and 3, I focus my discussion of Roman identities primarily on what the Romans themselves, at least as represented by the urban elite.

Ursula’s research looks at dress in the Roman Empire - both Rome and the provinces - and the way that clothing and appearance was used to assert and negotiate cultural identities. She is the author of The Toga and Roman Identity (Bloomsbury – in press) and Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire.

Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire (BAR International Series S). Oxford, Archaeopress. ISBN ; Rothe, U. "Der Grabstein der Severina Nutrix aus Köln: eine neue Deutung", Germa Rothe, U. Identification. The name España is of uncertain origin; from it derived the Hispania of the roman Empire.

Important regions within the modern nation are the Basque Country (País Vasco), the Catalan-Valencian-Balearic area, and Galicia—each of which has its own language and a strong regional identity.

This provocative and often controversial volume examines concepts of ethnicity, citizenship and nationhood, to determine what constituted cultural identity in the Roman Empire. The contributors draw together the most recent research and use diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives from archaeology, classical studies and ancient history to challenge our basic assumptions of.

Preview this book» What people are Elite culture and the identity of empire. Status and identity in the Roman world.

Reading gender in the Roman world. Experiencing Rome: Culture, Identity and Power in the Roman Empire Janet Huskinson Limited preview - Common terms and phrases.4/5(1).

The culture of ancient Rome existed throughout the almost year history of the civilization of Ancient term refers to the culture of the Roman Republic, later the Roman Empire, which at its peak covered an area from Lowland Scotland and Morocco to the Euphrates.

Life in ancient Rome revolved around the city of Rome, its famed seven hills, and its monumental architecture such as. Clothing in ancient Rome generally comprised a short-sleeved or sleeveless, knee-length tunic for men and boys, and a longer, usually sleeved tunic for women and girls.

On formal occasions, adult male citizens could wear a woolen toga, draped over their tunic, and married citizen women wore a woolen mantle, known as a palla, over a stola, a simple, long-sleeved, voluminous garment that hung to.

Her publications include the monograph Dress and Cultural Identity in the Rhine-Moselle Region of the Roman Empire (Oxford ); and the journal articles "The 'Third Way': Treveran Women’s Dress and the 'Gallic Ensemble'" (American Journal of Archaeology ) and "Dress in the Middle Danube Provinces: The Garments, Their Origins and Their.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire breaks new ground, negating the idea of a unified and easily defined Roman culture as over-simplistic. The contributors present the development of Roman cultural identity throughout the empire as a complex and two-way process, far removed from the previous dichotomy between the Roman invaders and the.Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire book.

Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire. DOI link for Cultural Identity in the Roman Empire I wish to turn to examine the case of the Roman house in the Campanian region of Italy, during the first century AD, as a demonstration of the ‘problem’ of establishing whether a self-conscious identity.

This collection of papers on 'Dress and Identity' arose from a seminar series held by the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, University of Birmingham in The present volume covers a wide chronological and geographical span: from archaic Greece to medieval Scotland by way of the Roman Empire and Anglo-Saxon England.